« The filtered professor | Main | More on filters and abandoning a course on porn »

March 07, 2005

Comments

Marie

Hugo,
Looks like you survived your weekend without losing all your hair. __How can we contribute to your cause? Or is it too late...I don't know how I missed this before.

Amy

Congratulations!

... I have a question, though. What is the labyrinth, and how is it a spiritual experience? It wasn't clear to me from just looking at the photos.

Creeping Jenny

Hugo, your news is wonderful and inspiring. Though I don't know that I'll ever return to Christianity, it's good to hear that there are churches out there focusing on things that are really materially important (like hunger) and spiritually important (like giving your teenagers a sense of perspective). Congratulations, and keep up the good work!

Chip

Hugo,

I commend and rejoice in your youth group's fast! I tend to think that progressives are ahead of many (most?) orthodox when it comes to issues like feeding the hungry. (I have no set of comparative statistics, however -- it's just a sense that I get.)

That being said, I have some concern whether progressive youth "are being raised with a commitment to follow Jesus and to feed His lambs" (other than in the sense of social work such as feeding the hungry) when you make the following comment:

"I always laugh when we sing that [Amazing Grace] at All Saints, since the number of folks at our church whose theology matches that hymn can be counted on one hand."

That quote, coupled with your comment recently about All Saints being certain about homosexuality being the chief social justice issue of the day but uncertain about almost anything else ("certain" and "uncertain" were not your exact words; I can't remember them), as well as your account of Bishop Bruno's confirmation last year, makes me concerned about what the youth are learning/believing about Christ. If progressive youth are not coming to the place where they can truly believe, "I once was lost but now am found/Was blind but now I see," are they being grounded in the fundamentals of the faith?

All of which, of course, is not meant to diminish the importance of your 30-hour fast...

Peace of Christ,
Chip

Hugo

Amy, our canvas labyrinth is modeled on one at Grace Cathedral (San Francisco), which is modeled on the one in Chartres.  Read more about it   here.

Hugo

Chip, I'm one of those folks for whom grace means something. At All Saints, in countless small ways, I do try and bring a relationship with Christ back into what we do in youth group. It isn't easy -- but our kids are learning about more than just being good. But at a place like this, the message of Jesus as best friend and Savior has to be slipped in rather than preached.

John

Which is a problem, and begs the question, if it cannot be preached, what is being preached instead? Even if it is good, it cannot be best.

Hugo

I won't let the best be the enemy of the good, John. "Whoever is not against me is for me", and all that.

Sarah Dylan Breuer

Hugo,

Especially because I'm involved in youth ministry, I always love hearing about the youth group at All Saints, and I really enjoyed seeing pictures of the group's fast to benefit ERD.

At the same time, because I'm involved in youth ministry, I'm a little concerned about pictures posted of young people, especially when identified by name (even first name), on the Internet. Because of the open nature of the 'Net, there are people who comb it looking for pictures of young people, and sometimes that's resulted in teens and children being stalked, or discovering that a photo of them has been modified (a face PhotoShopped onto a body with less or no clothing, for example) and circulated. Many parishes and dioceses have policies against posting photos of minors at all, and many others require a signed permission slip to be kept on file before one is posted -- or at least, before one is posted in which a particular young person could be singled out and identified by anyone viewing the photo.

Sad that we have to think about these things, but personally, I'd rather err on the side of safety with these things. I do post photo albums of young people for their own enjoyment, but when I do, I password-protect the album, giving the youth group and their parents the password, so they can view freely. After all, while it serves a good and important purpose for the youth group to be able to see photos that remind them of that great retreat or worship service we had, I can't think of an equally compelling and healthy reason that strangers would want to see them.

Of course, we all have to use our best judgment on these things, and sometimes it's worth taking risks, if it serves the community and the Good News in important ways.

Blessings,

Dylan

John

Sure, what you've done is good, and Christ calls us to do it. But, like myself, its the stuff you're not doing that bothers me.

Hugo

Dylan, good point. I'll talk about it with some folks from ASC soon. I don't know if Typepad lets me "password protect" an album or not.

Sarah Dylan Breuer

I believe that you can password-protect photo albums in TypePad. Communications is one of the ministry commissions I oversee for the parish I work for ( http://www.stmartinsinthefield.org ), so I just oversaw one major revamping of our online presence, and I'm in the midst of a second step which will probably move our whole site over to using TypePad as a content management system. One of the things that attracted me to TypePad for this purpose was that we could password-protect particular pages and photo albums, meaning that we could allow the youth of the parish to have their own team blog and photo albums, while still protecting their privacy and safety (and perhaps in the process ensuring great attendance at least once a month, when the monthly password is given out!).

I do wish that we didn't have to think quite so much about safety. :/

Blessings,

Dylan

The comments to this entry are closed.

My Photo

Regular reads

Blog powered by Typepad
Member since 01/2004